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AP 0863: Where Should I Start to Create My Own Video Studio at Home?

AP 0863: Where Should I Start to Create My Own Video Studio at Home?

By Pat Flynn on

AskPat 863 Episode Transcript

Pat Flynn: Hey, what’s up everybody? Pat Flynn here, and welcome to episode 863 of AskPat. Thank you so much for joining me today. As always, I’m here to help you by answering your online business questions, five days a week.

Before we get to today’s question from Eric, I do want to mention a couple things. One, to make sure you subscribe because starting in episode 900, this is 863, but starting in Episode 900 we’re going to be dropping in some hints and clues in terms of how to win a bunch money leading into episode 1,000 which is happening in November so make sure you subscribe now so you don’t miss out on those clues and those hints.

Then, finally I want to give you a resource, and this resource relates to the question coming in from Eric today, and that resource is DIYVideoGuy.com. It’s also DIYVideoGuide.com but either one works. This is a site run by my good friend Caleb Wojcik to help you with your own video set up, so to set up Eric’s question, here we go.

Eric: Hello Pat, this is Eric Pannell in Charlotte, North Carolina with StartupsWithNoCode.com. I’m really trying to venture out and kick up a notch with my video marketing. I know that’s always something I know you’ve shared in the past that I know you do a lot of and I really want to go in that direction to kind of build up my version of a home studio and quiet honestly, I’m not sure where to start. Looking for the type of background screens or the stands and the video lighting umbrellas. And I may not even be using the right terms but I think you get the gist of where I’m going. Would love to get your thoughts and your direction on where I should start. Like to try to keep it as lean as possible. Don’t want to spend a lot of money but, somewhere that gives me a good starting point, kind of venture out into video marketing. Love your work, man. Keep up the good work. Faithful follower here so, I’ll be on the look out for your answer. Thank you, and have a great day.

Pat Flynn: Hey, Eric. What’s up? Thank you so much for the question. I appreciate you. I appreciate you following what I do and asking this question today. Thank you so much. Now, I mentioned a resource there earlier and that is DIYVideoGuide.com and this is by my good friend Caleb Wojcik, my own videographer. He helps people figure out how to create their own studios and video setups and he does it at many different levels. He, of course, being a professional, has a lot of the high-end equipment but I understand that you’re looking for starting lean. He also shares a lot of things related to that as well.

Now, I will give you some information based on my own experience, but again, I would recommend going to DIYVideoGuide.com. Now, for me, camera is obviously really important if you have a phone, like an iPhone or an Android phone, that will do. That’s all you need to get started. Now, you can upgrade yourself to a DSLR camera in the future. I have a Sony RX10 Mk III which is a lot of words and random numbers and things. But, it works really well for video and it’s also a great all-around camera so I use it a lot for filming my family and taking pictures and stuff like that. There’s also the Canon Rebel T4i or T5i I think or I can’t even remember them because I haven’t used my Rebel in a while. Those are great as well for filming yourself at a more higher end situation. But honestly, the phone is all you need.

In terms of sound, that’s another thing you need to worry about. Sound can be solved in various ways. You can record directly into a portable recorder. The one that I recommend is a Zoom H4N. There’s also a Zoom H6N with a few more inputs but you just need a Zoom H4N and then you can get all kinds of things that can connect with it. You can even use just the recorder itself to record, as long as you kind of have it in the right spot while you’re recording.

But, I would recommend connecting an XLR connected lavalier mic. And what a lavalier mic is essentially ones that clip onto your tie or your shirt or your blouse, right? It’s not a giant shotgun mic that’s sort of over head like the ones you see on those sitcoms. And it’s not a wireless one either. For this, it’s an XLR connection which is sort of that big three pronged connection that goes into the Zoom H4N and then on the other end is the little tiny one that you kind of hook on. You put the wire underneath your shirt or inside your vest or whatever and you clip it on to the side and that works out really, really well. You get really good audio quality so, if you’re going to be getting very serious with audio, that’s what you can use.

But, depending on the style of videos you want to do, you might even be able to get away with something a little bit cheaper such as a Rode Smartlav. That is R-O-D-E and then Smartlav. That actually connects directly to your phone and it has great audio quality too. I will say the connection or the cord is very short so if you want to extend that you’re going to have to buy an extension. But it works out really well. It also plugs into your microphone jack or your headphone jack. Now, if you are using an iPhone 7 which doesn’t have those jacks anymore, you’ll have to get one of those adapters that plugs into your Thunderbolt or to this sort of regular connection there for the iPhone 7. I mean, that’ll work and the audio quality that comes from the Rode Smartlav, Smart L-A-V, works out really well. It’s very cheap considering the great sound quality that can come out of that. So that works really well.

Then, the last thing you have to worry about is lighting. You got the video, you got the audio, and of course this is a really quick overview, right? I would definitely recommend checking out Caleb’s site, DIYVideoGuy.com. It’s also DIYVideoGuide.com. But the other thing is lighting. Now, natural lighting is great but the hard thing about that is, even though it looks great, it’s hard to control because sometimes you get cloud cover. Sometimes it’s gray skies; actually gray skies are when it’s best if you’re shooting outside. The sun can be very harsh at times and, of course, the sun changes position and all those kinds of things. Now, if you have a controlled environment set up in your home, that could be even better. Honestly, if you’re going to be doing a lot of these, you want to have a set up that you can then kind of walk into and just hit record in and that’s sort of this dream situation so that you don’t have to worry about setting up and tearing down the whole time.

But, once you start getting into lighting a little bit, it can actually take up a ton of room and so, you start to kind of crowd the spaces a little bit. So, if you have a space in the garage where you can control the lighting, that could work out really well. Typically what you want to do is install a three point lighting system. You’re going to have what’s called those boxes like you mention, those soft boxes. There’s cowboy studios which you can look up on Amazon. You can honestly get a three point lighting system kit for just a couple hundreds bucks. That could do the job for you at least at the start.

The way it works is, typically, you have two lights in front of you. If you are facing the camera, there’s two lights on either side of the camera sort of 45 degrees from you and they’re pointing sort of kind of above but towards you a little bit. Then, you have something lighting the background behind you. That’s really all you need. And in terms of what you put in the back, that’s up to you. A lot of people like to put some scenery or some sort of bookshelf or something like that just to give it a little bit of character and flavor. Other people like to have just a completely white color or a certain color of a kind that matches their brand and that could work out really well too.

What I would do is definitely research on YouTube and find styles of videos that you like and adopt the ones that you like. Obviously don’t copy, but you can pull from—you can get inspiration from different—YouTube channels out there and just see what you like. I mean, there’s different kinds of ways to do video marketing, right? I mean, you might not even need a setup at all. You can keep it kind of raw.

You can do what Chalene Johnson does and she just has a ring light connected to her phone. A ring light is one that you snap on and it really creates this nice LED sort of really bright looking thing that points to your face and it records really, really well. She carries this around with her and she shoots these live videos from her own home or wherever she’s at and what she does is then, takes those live videos which are done on Facebook typically and then she puts them on YouTube. That becomes her, sort of, marketing strategy on YouTube through video and then she takes the audio from that and turns them into one of her podcasts and that works out really well too.

You could repurpose and do it that way as well but it’s a little bit more raw because it’s live and it’s okay, because live, it’s okay to be a little bit messy. I think if you can start to gather a following on live it could work out really well for you too, so that is a form of video marketing other than posting on YouTube but you can do both. But in terms of setting up a home studio, yeah, those are some of the quick tips that I have for you but I would definitely recommend some of the guides that DIYVideoGuy.com has and start from there.

Eric, thank you so much. I want to wish you all the best and I look forward to checking out one of your videos one day. Thank you so much. And, always of course, I want to hook you up with an AskPat t-shirt for having your question featured here on the show. For anybody else out there, if you have a question that you’d like potentially featured here on the show as well, all you have to do is head on over to AskPat.com and you can ask right there on that page.

Finally, as always, I love to end with a quote and today’s quote is from Voltaire. “Originality is nothing but judicious imitation.” All right guys, take care. Thanks so much and I look forward to serving you in the next episode of AskPat. Bye.

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